What If Oil and Natural Gas Are Renewable Resources?

Estimates of America’s oil reserves are constantly being revised upward. Many believe this is due to the increasingly sophisticated technology being used to drill and measure them. Could it be that oil is a renewable energy source the same as corn for ethanol. If so this puts a big hole in Obama’s sales pitch for sources controlled by his cronies.

Excerpt: President Barack Obama and his green energy confederates are determined to scare the public about a declining supply of “fossil fuels.” If we accept the idea that oil is produced by the conversion of organic matter — from plants to dinosaurs — under extreme pressure, we must also accept the idea that there is a limited supply of oil and that we’ve got to do everything we can to find a replacement for fossil fuels before we run out.

The evidence is mounting that not only do we have more than a century’s worth of recoverable oil in the United States alone (even if there is a limit to the earth’s oil supply), but that we also actually have a limitless supply of Texas tea because oil is in fact a renewable resource that is being constantly created deep under the earth’s surface and which rises upward, where microscopic organisms that thrive in the intense pressure and heat miles below us interact with and alter it.

In other words, we have an unending supply of oil, some of which is constantly migrating upward from the depths at which it is created to refill existing oil deposits, and much more of which remains far below the surface. This oil can be recovered using existing technology.

Scientist Thomas Gold presents the decades-old theory of “abiotic” oil-creation, which supports these facts, in his book, The Deep Hot Biosphere. In it he explains that the idea of the “biotic” creation of “fossil fuels” — that decaying organic matter is compressed into oil — is incorrect. In fact, the earth is constantly producing new oil very deep below its surface, and in some cases the oil flows up to replenish existing oil fields thought to be exhausted. In simple terms, the microscopic organisms mentioned above interact with the hydrocarbons, altering them and leaving their footprint, thus disproving the notion that oil is a “fossil fuel.”

Here’s an example of how the process plays out:

Eugene Island is an underwater mountain located about 80 miles off the coast of Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico. In 1973 oil was struck and off-shore platform Eugene 330 erected. The field began production at 15,000 barrels a day, then gradually fell off, as is normal, to 4,000 barrels a day in 1989. Then came the surprise; it reversed itself and increased production to 13,000 barrels a day. Probable reserves have been increased to 400 million barrels from 60 million. The field appears to be filling from below and the crude coming up today is from a geological age different from the original crude, which leads to the speculation that the world has limitless supplies of petroleum.

Read full American Thinker here.

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