Solar highways, a green solution to our energy needs

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A fantastic idea that should be developed and implemented immediately if found to be viable and pays for itself.  This makes those stupid ugly windmills and solar panel farms obsolete and a thing of the past.  The $ Billions that Obama gave to his benefactors was a waste.  At least this idea has a lot of forward thinking and potential.

Read full report here.

ABC News Obtains Explosive White House E-Mails on Solyndra Loan

Later on the White House, after Obama previously traveling to Solyndra and taking credit for it, blamed it on Bush, saying his administration was about to fast track the loan. Here is the Republican response: “Republicans pushed back hard against this version of events, unearthing internal Energy Department emails that indicate the panel evaluating the loans had made the unanimous decision to shelve Solyndra’s application two weeks before Obama took office.”

Obama at his Saul Alinsky best, lying at its best to obfuscate.

Excerpt: Newly uncovered emails show the White House closely monitored the Energy Department’s deliberations over a $535 million government loan to Solyndra, the politically-connected solar energy firm that recently went bankrupt and is now the subject of a criminal investigation.

The company’s solar panel factory was heralded as a centerpiece of the president’s green energy plan — billed as a way to jump start a promising new industry. And internal emails uncovered by investigators for the House Energy and Commerce Committee that were shared exclusively with ABC News show the Obama administration was keenly monitoring the progress of the loan, even as analysts were voicing serious concerns about the risk involved.

“This deal is NOT ready for prime time,” one White House budget analyst wrote in a March 10, 2009 email, nine days before the administration formally announced the loan.

“If you guys think this is a bad idea, I need to unwind the W[est] W[ing] QUICKLY,” wrote Ronald A. Klain, who was chief of staff to Vice President Joe Biden, in another email sent March 7, 2009. The “West Wing” is the portion of the White House complex that holds the offices of the president and his top staffers. Klain declined comment to ABC News.

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White House ON THE RECORD reaction to ABC News’ WH Emails on Solyndra Loan

In reaction to the ABC story, White House spokesman Eric Schultz told FBN:

“This loan guarantee was pursued by both the Bush and Obama Administrations. Private sector investors – who put more than $1 billion of their own money on the line – also saw great potential in the company. As the Department of Energy has made clear, they have always recognized that not every one of the innovative companies helped would succeed, but we can’t stop investing in game-changing technologies that are key to America’s leadership in the global economy. While we are disappointed by this particular outcome, we continue to believe the clean energy jobs race is one that America can, must and will win. The question we, as a country, have to ask ourselves is: are the jobs of the future going to be created here in the United States are elsewhere?”

Read full FOX Nation report here.

GM sells just 281 Chevy Volts in February, Nissan only moves 67 Leafs

The old movie adage “build it and they will come” doesn’t seem to apply when it comes to Obama’s pet project. Maybe the slogan should be changed to “build something people want and they will come”.

Excerpt: Peruse Chevrolet’s February sales release, and you’ll notice one number that’s blatantly missing: how many Chevy Volts were sold. The number – a very modest 281 – is available in the company’s detailed data (PDF), but it apparently isn’t something that GM wants to highlight. Keeping the number quiet is understandable, since it’s lower than the 321 that Chevy sold in January.

Nissan doesn’t have anything to brag about here, either (and it avoided any mention of the Leaf sales in its press release). Why? Well, back in January, the company sold 87 Leafs. In February? Just 67. Where does that leave us? Well, here’s the big scorecard for all U.S. sales of these vehicles thus far:

Volt: 928
Leaf: 173

Ouch. The big questions, of course, revolve around one word: “Why?” Is ramping up production still a problem? Is demand weak? Are unscrupulous dealers to blame? When will sales start to climb? And what are these numbers doing to plug-in vehicle projects at other automakers? We don’t know all the answers,

Read full Autobloggreen article here.

Deception and the Unseen Consequences of "Green Jobs"

For those of us that remember “way back” when we had a press that actually performed the job of investigative reporting, lies that were told by our elected officials somehow had a way of coming to the surface and biting them in the rear. Today, with the MSM in bed with the liberal/progressive/left, and full of pretty faces rather than true journalists, it is much harder for the average American to know what to and what not to believe.

Was watching the news the other day and found out that the statements, that Obama made about the proposed budget; that it would, in a few years, bring revenues and spending in sync and everything would be “peaches and cream” thereafter, are somewhat less than true.

The problem was that he forgot to mention that his calculation omitted interest on the $14 billion of debt. This interest, that amounts to hundreds of billions of dollars each year would be added to the debt in a never ending cycle. So much for the “truth” from our elected politicians.

Now we find out that the “Green Jobs” so highly touted by Obama in his State Of The Union address are not what we might expect. It turns out that the majority of the jobs are temporary, ala the stimulus, and he failed to take into account the job losses caused by the diversion of funds. In addition, the increased cost of energy will give the average family less disposable income to buy other things, thus destroying many jobs along the way.

Then there comes the topic of energy self sufficiency that Obama attaches to his green initiative. It turns out that much of the hardware required, will be produced in China. Why you say? Well, cheaper non-unionized labor is one reason, but another more important one, is that China has a near monopoly on certain of the rare earth elements needed for storage batteries, light bulbs, solar cells and magnets in wind turbines. Now we will be at the mercy of one country for our energy needs, China, instead of the 60 or so countries that are now exporting oil to us. A recent article I read put it this way, “Obama’s green power builds China’s red power”.

Are we confident that the government is telling us the whole truth about the “Green Jobs” program’s benefits? Probably not. Is this initiative doing more harm than good to our economy? Most likely.

The Energy Equation: Practical Fact vs. Political Fiction

Sometimes you look at what the bureaucrats in Washington are spending your money on and want to cry. If what they spend was based on the profit motive, none of the projects would be undertaken. If government would stick to the basics for which it was founded and let the private sector fight it out for the ultimate profit, the nation, as a whole would be better off and technological advances would go through the roof.

In this article, calling the GM Chevrolet Volt, “the first coal-powered transport vehicle since the decline of the steam locomotive” is a gem.

Excerpt: Politically motivated energy solutions continue to exacerbate the problems they were supposed to counteract.

In the early 1980s, American car-makers were refining the design strategies necessary to meet the mileage requirements imposed by the government. One of the Big Three automakers’ programs called for the use of a small four-cylinder engine equipped with a supercharger — a mechanism that intermittently forces air into the combustion chamber to provide more complete combustion and greater power when needed.

Following a planning meeting with one of the key suppliers, a design engineer was asked the inevitable question: Is this going to work? He smiled and replied that although the mileage standards would be met, it might be more practical to consider all of the energy inputs that go into the manufacture of an automobile engine. He noted that the metal has to be mined or reclaimed from scrap, then smelted. Depending on the engine component, it then requires forming, casting, machining, and other operations prior to final assembly. There is also energy usage for transportation at virtually every step of the process, as well as indirect costs related to plant operation. He noted that with proper care, the typical six- or eight-cylinder engine could have a useful life that frequently exceeded 200,000 miles. Unfortunately, the supercharged smaller engines would run so hot that many would not see 100,000 miles. The end result: the improved mileage standards resulted in a net expenditure of far more energy.

If one had to pick the single best (or worst) example of the Obama administration’s inability to view the big picture when it comes to energy-related matters, one could hardly find a better example than the much-vaunted and publicized Chevrolet Volt. A totally electric automobile with a 60-mile range that can be recharged in the owner’s garage or at remote recharging stations, the Volt is so expensive that the government has had to create a subsidy program to incentivize buyers. Because of its zero emissions, it has been touted as the car of the future and a major step on the road to solving our environmental problems.

Once again, the reality is quite different. Most of our domestic electrical energy supply derives from coal-burning power plants, and in view of the administration’s refusal to aggressively pursue nuclear power, that is likely to be the case into the short- and mid-term future. Seen in this light, the Chevrolet Volt is, in reality, a coal-powered automobile. If one were to produce a graphic illustrating how much coal would be required to generate the electricity that would power the Volt every day over the course of — say — a ten-year life, it would become apparent that the actual carbon footprint is huge.

Once again, the equation does not add up, and the administration that purports to be on the side of the angels when it comes to the environment has produced, through its General Motors subsidiary, the first coal-powered transport vehicle since the decline of the steam locomotive.

Until and unless the administration is willing to solicit and heed the advice and guidance of the private-sector professionals with the technical and business experience to help set practical policies, the equation is not going to balance. Instead, we will continue to overpay for impractical non-solutions.

Read full American Thinker article here.

The Energy Equation: Practical Fact vs. Political Fiction

Sometimes you look at what the bureaucrats in Washington are spending your money on and want to cry. If what they spend was based on the profit motive, none of the projects would be undertaken. If government would stick to the basics for which it was founded and let the private sector fight it out for the ultimate profit, the nation, as a whole would be better off and technological advances would go through the roof.

In this article, calling the GM Chevrolet Volt, “the first coal-powered transport vehicle since the decline of the steam locomotive” is a gem.

Excerpt: Politically motivated energy solutions continue to exacerbate the problems they were supposed to counteract.

In the early 1980s, American car-makers were refining the design strategies necessary to meet the mileage requirements imposed by the government. One of the Big Three automakers’ programs called for the use of a small four-cylinder engine equipped with a supercharger — a mechanism that intermittently forces air into the combustion chamber to provide more complete combustion and greater power when needed.

Following a planning meeting with one of the key suppliers, a design engineer was asked the inevitable question: Is this going to work? He smiled and replied that although the mileage standards would be met, it might be more practical to consider all of the energy inputs that go into the manufacture of an automobile engine. He noted that the metal has to be mined or reclaimed from scrap, then smelted. Depending on the engine component, it then requires forming, casting, machining, and other operations prior to final assembly. There is also energy usage for transportation at virtually every step of the process, as well as indirect costs related to plant operation. He noted that with proper care, the typical six- or eight-cylinder engine could have a useful life that frequently exceeded 200,000 miles. Unfortunately, the supercharged smaller engines would run so hot that many would not see 100,000 miles. The end result: the improved mileage standards resulted in a net expenditure of far more energy.

If one had to pick the single best (or worst) example of the Obama administration’s inability to view the big picture when it comes to energy-related matters, one could hardly find a better example than the much-vaunted and publicized Chevrolet Volt. A totally electric automobile with a 60-mile range that can be recharged in the owner’s garage or at remote recharging stations, the Volt is so expensive that the government has had to create a subsidy program to incentivize buyers. Because of its zero emissions, it has been touted as the car of the future and a major step on the road to solving our environmental problems.

Once again, the reality is quite different. Most of our domestic electrical energy supply derives from coal-burning power plants, and in view of the administration’s refusal to aggressively pursue nuclear power, that is likely to be the case into the short- and mid-term future. Seen in this light, the Chevrolet Volt is, in reality, a coal-powered automobile. If one were to produce a graphic illustrating how much coal would be required to generate the electricity that would power the Volt every day over the course of — say — a ten-year life, it would become apparent that the actual carbon footprint is huge.

Once again, the equation does not add up, and the administration that purports to be on the side of the angels when it comes to the environment has produced, through its General Motors subsidiary, the first coal-powered transport vehicle since the decline of the steam locomotive.

Until and unless the administration is willing to solicit and heed the advice and guidance of the private-sector professionals with the technical and business experience to help set practical policies, the equation is not going to balance. Instead, we will continue to overpay for impractical non-solutions.

Read full American Thinker article here.